Undergraduate

  • ENST-101 Environmental Studies

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary course that focuses on the social science and humanities disciplines as they are related to the natural environment. Students will study texts from those disciplines to acquire a deeper understanding of the values and beliefs that underlie environmental issues. The course will also investigate the policy-making processes and institutions through which those issues are decided, and the social inequalities in the distribution of environmental problems. Texts to be studied will range from literature, philosophy and film to policy statements, impact reports, community advocacy materials, and investigative journalism.

  • ENST-310 The Civilian Conservation Corps and the American Landscape

    Prerequisites:

    Class will meet for 75 minutes a week and then travel over spring break. Instructor's consent is required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will focus on the history and lasting affect of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) on the physical and political landscape of the United States. From 1933 to 1942 more than 3 million men served in the CCC, and this course will track the progression of their work from the planting of billions of trees to the development of recreational opportunities on federal and state lands. Over time, CCC work progressed from the conservation of natural resources to the conservation of human resources and promotion of recreation on public lands. As the CCC changed over time, so too did public opinion concerning the CCC's work and mission. This class will explore opposition to CCC projects by significant figures in America's environmental movement such as Aldo Leopold and Bob Marshall, and the resulting influence on the environmental movement in America. We will also look at the role the CCC played in redefining conservation and creating a mainstream environmental movement. In addition, this class will consider the affect that the CCC had on New Deal politics. Finally, this class will study the lasting legacy that the CCC left on the American landscape through the development of other conservation corps programs. Students will also read first hand accounts, view films, and possibly hear directly from a CCC veteran. As a class connected with an Alternative Spring Break trip, this experiential education offering will allow students to experience and complete similar work to that completed by CCC members. During Alternative Spring Break, students will visit important CCC history sites such as the first CCC camp in the country and a major national park development project. During the course, assignments will challenge students to identify CCC sites in Massachusetts or their home states. Local site visits are a possibility for this class. Other assignments will challenge students to identify modern environmental organizations who can trace their origins to the

    Type:

    Local Engagement Experience

  • ENST-315 Foundations of Environmental Education

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will provide an overview of Environmental Education (EE) by looking at how EE has been defined, how the field has changed over time, and how our own connections with the environment can inform our understanding and practice of this work. Students will consider the goals of EE and the variety of approaches utilized in the field to reach those goals. Age appropriate environmental education, place-based education, and urban environmental education will also be studied.

  • ENST-321 Introduction to Permaculture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Permaculture is the design of food systems and social structures to provide for human needs while restoring ecosystem health. Examining the interconnections between environmental, social and economic components, Permaculture is informed by the disciplines of systems ecology, ecological design and ethno-ecology.

  • ENST-401 Environmental Studies Capstone Course

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A course examining a contemporary environmental issue from various disciplinary perspectives. Using a case-study approach, students will develop a proposal to address the identified issue from the perspectives of policy, ethics, justice, science and culture. As appropriate, the proposal will be field tested, demonstrated, or presented to the local community. Possible topics include sustainable development, urban air pollution, sustainable farming, or water conservation.

  • ENST-402 Environmental Studies Capstone II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A continuation of ENST 401

  • ENST-403 Environmental Studies Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement. Junior standing or above required or consent of the instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course combines a practicum placement of at least 10 hours a week for 12 weeks in a position that offered the student significant opportunity to learn about environmental problems as the basis for reflection, analysis, and skill development through appropriate reading, writing, and oral presentation assignments. Specific learning objectives will be tailored to the student's placement. Interested students should consult instructor in advance. ECR. 4 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing, limited to Environmental Studies majors and minors.

  • ENST-555 Senior Thesis

    Prerequisites:

    Grade point average 3.0 overall, 3.4 in major; completion of a minimum of 8 credits in courses that are part of the Environmental Studies major at Suffolk University; consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Individual program of reading, research, writing on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the Committee on Environmental Studies, for Environmental Studies majors who are candidates for honors in Environmental Studies and who wish to prepare a thesis for submission to the honors committee. Must normally be taken in the first semester of the senior year. Prerequisites: Grade point average 3.0 overall, 3.4 in major; completion of a minimum of 8 credits in courses that are part of the Environmental Studies major at Suffolk University; consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every fall.

  • ENVS-111 Majors' Environmental Science

    Prerequisites:

    Open to Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors, or by permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrently with ENVS L111

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Applies the fundamentals of science to environmental issues. Topics include population dynamics and resources, environmental degradation, ecosystems, geologic processes, deforestation, biodiversity, climate change, air, soil, and water resource management, and pollution and risks to health. This course is open to all environmental science and environmental studies majors and minors. Other students will be admitted by permission of the instructor. Must be taken concurrently with ENVS L111. 3 hours lecture. 1 term. 3 credits. Normally offered fall evenings.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • ENVS-L111 Majors' Environmental Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Open to Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors, or by permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrently with ENVS 111

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate topics covered in ENVS 111. Field testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trips are required. This course is required for all environmental science and environmental studies majors and minors. Concurrent enrollment in ENVS 111 is required. 3 hour laboratory. Normally offered fall.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • ENVS-112 Majors' Environmental Science II

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Topics introduced in ENVS 111 are further developed to focus on how environmental conditions affect human, animal and ecological health. Areas may include control of environmental contaminants; public health and infectious disease control; antibiotic resistance; health issues associated with food production; contained animal feeding operations; the effects of industrialization on the environment; and the impact of disasters on environmental health. This course is open to environmental science and studies majors and minors or by permission from the instructor. 3 credits. Normally offered spring evenings. Must be taken concurrently with ENVS L112

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ENVS-L112 Majors' Environmental Science II Lab

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate topics covered ENVS 112. Exercises may include analysis of environmental samples for heavy metal contamination and evidence of sewage contamination or air samples for criteria pollutants. Field trips are required. This course is required for Environmental studies majors and minors. 1 credit Normally offered in spring semester evenings. requisite: enrollment in ENVS 112

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ENVS-436 Environmental Science Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Application of the principles and techniques of environmental science to a specific environmental problem through a practicum placement of at least 10 hours per week for 12 weeks. Typically, this experience will include literature research, classroom meetings, and field work in an off-campus environmental agency. ECR 1 term- 4 credits. Normally offered fall and spring. Prerequisite: junior standing; limited to Environmental Science majors and minors.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENVS-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    This is an independent study in environmental studies. Topics will vary.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • SCI-171 The Built World: How Humans Engineer Environments

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The most basic needs of humans have not changed - water, food, and shelter - but the means of meeting these needs has. In this course, we will examine how technology-driven societies operate by studying how cities are built and how they function. Topics will include water supply and distribution systems; transportation systems (including road and bridge design and construction); building design, construction, and operation (including skyscraper and sustainable building design), and waste removal systems (municipal and industrial wastewater removal and treatment, solid waste removal and treatment). This is not a course about little gadgets and widgets; this is a course about big engineering marvels; and it emphasizes applications of science - how things work - rather than scientific theory.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-H171 The Built World: How Humans Engineer Environments- Honors

    Prerequisites:

    Honors students or at least a 3.3 GPA only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The most basic needs of humans have not changed - water, food, and shelter - but the means of meeting these needs has. In this course, we will examine how technology-driven societies operate by studying how cities are built and how they function. Topics will include water supply and distribution systems; transportation systems (including road and bridge design and construction); building design, construction, and operation (including skyscraper and sustainable building design), and waste removal systems (municipal and industrial wastewater removal and treatment, solid waste removal and treatment). This is not a course about little gadgets and widgets; this is a course about big engineering marvels; and it emphasizes applications of science - how things work - rather than scientific theory.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR,Honors

  • SCI-173 Mapping Our World The Power of Digital Maps

    Prerequisites:

    SCI L173 Must be taken concurrently Knowledge of Windows type Application

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Geographic Information Science (GIS) link information (number of fire hydrants on a block) to features on a map (e.g., a point representing street address) that has a designated geographic location (as designated by global coordinates). Unlike paper maps, GIS software allows the production of interactive maps that allows the user to layer data, to indicate spatial patterns, to analyze trends, and to combine different features of the mapped area in novel ways. For example, a business person may wish to use GIS to determine the optimum location of retail outlet (based on the mapped demographics of a neighborhood), while an environmental engineer may use GIS to describe the location of outfalls to see how they correlate to areas of stream pollution. In this course, students will be introduced to maps, map vocabulary and attributes, and GIS mapping through a series of mapping exercises. A knowledge of Windows-type applications is presumed.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-L173 Mapping Our World Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with SCI-173

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This laboratory illustrates concepts and methods taught in SCI 173. In this lab students will be introduced to maps, map vocabulary and attributes, and GIS mapping through a series of mapping exercises. A knowledge of Windows-type applications is presumed.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • UES-101 Environmental Studies

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Focuses on the natural environment through the lens of social science and humanities. Students will study texts from those disciplines to acquire a deeper understanding of the values and beliefs that underlie environmental issues. Students will investigate the policy-making processes and institutions through which those issues are decided, and the social inequalities in the distribution of environmental problems. Texts to be studied will range from literature, philosophy, and film to policy statements, impact reports, community advocacy materials, and investigative journalism.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • UES-107 Introduction to Drones

    Prerequisites:

    UES-L107

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Unmanned autonomous systems (UAS) or Drones are high-tech, intelligent machines capable of traveling by air, land, or sea via a remote connection. This course presents concepts and practical methods of using Unmanned Vehicles in a professional context, particularly for environmental projects. UAVs are increasingly being used in a professional capacity such as cinematography and filming, real estate, construction, surveying, mapping, agriculture, industrial inspections, utilities inspections and many more. The course covers mission planning, operations, field data collection, data processing, legal implications, data analysis and data deliverables. The course and laboratory will include learning flying micro-drones and preparing to pass the Federal Aviation Administration's Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airmen (Part 107) exam. The course will have an associated Laboratory component in which students will learn how to properly plan effective flight missions, fly safely and legally, develop risk management strategies, analyze the data captured and convert it into a useful data deliverable.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • UES-L107 Introduction to Drones Lab

    Prerequisites:

    UES-107

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Unmanned autonomous systems (UAS) or Drones are high-tech, intelligent machines capable of traveling by air, land, or sea via a remote connection. This course presents concepts and practical methods of using Unmanned Vehicles in a professional context, particularly for environmental projects. UAVs are increasingly being used in a professional capacity such as cinematography and filming, real estate, construction, surveying, mapping, agriculture, industrial inspections, utilities inspections and many more. The course covers mission planning, operations, field data collection, data processing, legal implications, data analysis and data deliverables. The course and laboratory will include learning flying micro-drones and preparing to pass the Federal Aviation Administration's Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airmen (Part 107) exam. The course will have an associated Laboratory component in which students will learn how to properly plan effective flight missions, fly safely and legally, develop risk management strategies, analyze the data captured and convert it into a useful data deliverable.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • UES-111 Majors' Environmental Science

    Prerequisites:

    Open to Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors, or by permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrently with UES-L111

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Applies the fundamentals of science to environmental issues. Topics include population dynamics and resources, environmental degradation, ecosystems, geologic processes, deforestation, biodiversity, climate change, air, soil, and water resource management, and pollution and risks to health.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • UES-L111 Majors' Environmental Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Open to Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors, or by permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrently with UES-111

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate topics covered in UES 111. Field testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trips may be required.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • UES-115 Organic Chemistry Bootcamp

    Prerequisites:

    Take CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 previously or concurrently; Environmental Science majors only

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Summarizes and reviews the main organic functional groups of importance in the environment, their reactivity, and their basic mechanisms (ionic or radical) in environmental systems.

  • UES-121 Science, Art, and the Environment

    Prerequisites:

    Take UES-L121 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines art and cultural objects through the lens of the biological, chemical, and physical principles of the materials and processes we use to make them. Includes consideration of factors important in art conservation. Provides an environmental context for the manufacture and use of art materials and the preservation of cultural objects.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • UES-L121 Science, Art, and the Environment Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Take UES-121 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Provides hands-on work with pigments, dyes, and other art materials using the basic principles of science and technology. Students will conduct laboratory experiments that produce art objects and other consumer products. Instruction in safe laboratory practices and basic techniques such as determining mass and volume, representing data in the form of tables, graphs, and graphics. Practice in synthesizing compounds like paints and finishes and in evaluating methods of art conservation.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • UES-211 Environmental Science II

    Prerequisites:

    Must be take concurrently with UES-L211

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Focuses on how environmental conditions affect human, animal and ecological health. Areas may include control of environmental contaminants; public health and infectious disease control; sanitation systems; antibiotic resistance; health issues associated with food production; the effects of industrialization on the environment; and the impact of disasters on environmental health.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • UES-L211 Environmental Science II Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with UES-211

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates topics covered UES 211 through laboratory exercises. Exercises may include analysis of environmental samples (soil, water, and air). Field trips may be required.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • UES-225 Geographical Information Science

    Prerequisites:

    CMPSC-F131.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides the fundamentals of geographic information science (GIS) including the history of automated mapping. A review of the necessary hardware and software elements used in GIS is presented. Hands-on exercises with computerized mapping software are required.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • UES-L225 Geographic Information Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    CMPSC-F131. Must be taken concurrently with UES-225

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Required companion computer laboratory to be taken concurrently with UES 225.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • UES-255 Chemistry and the Environment

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 112/L112 or permission of instructor and UES L255

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Investigates the chemical processes (including biologically mediated ones) that affect the cycling and ultimate fate of chemicals in the environment (air, water, and soil). Remediation and treatment methods used to minimize pollutant loads and mitigate their impacts are considered.

  • UES-L255 Chemistry and the Environment Laboratory

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 112/L112 or permission of instructor and UES 255.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates chemical processes in the environment and the methods of analysis of contaminants via laboratory exercises and application of instrumental techniques.

  • UES-301 Issues in Environmental Justice

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates the environmental justice movement, its basis in law, and its leaders. Students will study key topics pertaining to environmental and health disparities and learn about community organizing and advocacy and their application to shape decision-making. Sustainable practices and their integration into daily life to create healthy communities and equity will be considered.

  • UES-310 The Civilian Conservation Corps and the American Landscape

    Prerequisites:

    Class will meet for 75 minutes a week and then travel over spring break. Instructor's consent is required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Focuses on the history and lasting effect of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) on the physical and political landscape of the United States. Tracks the progression of work of the more than 3 million men who served in the CCC from 1933 to 1942, from the planting of billions of trees to the development of recreational opportunities on federal and state lands. Looks at the role the CCC played in redefining conservation and creating a mainstream environmental movement. Investigates the lasting legacy that the CCC left on the American landscape through the development of other conservation corps programs. Connected with a required Alternative Spring Break trip, this experiential education offering will allow students to experience and complete similar work to that completed by CCC members.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Local Engagement Experience

  • UES-315 Foundations of Environmental Education

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Provides an overview of Environmental Education (EE) by investigating how EE has been defined, how the field has changed over time, and how our own connections with the environment can inform our understanding and practice of this work. Students will consider the goals of EE and the variety of approaches utilized in the field to reach those goals. Age appropriate environmental education, place-based education, and urban environmental education will also be studied.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • UES-321 Introduction to Permaculture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Permaculture is the design of food systems and social structures to provide for human needs while restoring ecosystem health. Examining the interconnections between environmental, social and economic components, Permaculture is informed by the disciplines of systems ecology, ecological design and ethno-ecology.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • UES-325 Environmental History of US

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores how Americans have understood the environment and their relationship to it through analysis of classic environmental texts, historical contexts, and societal perspectives. Analyzes how the environment has changed from pre-colonial times to the present and how these changes have been described through the lens of environmental history. Themes include differing viewpoints of European and indigenous peoples toward the natural environment, the impacts of the Western expansion on native species and landscapes, the rise of industrialism and its impacts on natural resources and ecosystems, and the rise of 20th century environmentalism.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • UES-330 Research Methods

    Prerequisites:

    UES-111 UES-L111 UES-211 UES-L211

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    How environmental professionals decide what to study, how they select a research design, sample and collect data, analyze results, interpret findings, and write up reports. Students are introduced to the techniques most frequently used by environmental professionals and undertake their own small research project. Required for all environmental studies majors.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • UES-350 Community Food Systems

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores local and bioregional food systems through the lens of holistic design and of building a resilient food culture through the ethics of sustainability. Students will examine environmental, social and economic factors of building successful community food systems from seed to table. Provides students with the tools to assess the decisions that direct our current food chain including processing, marketing, and food distribution. Students will make connections to food justice, health, food insecurity while analyzing commercial agriculture and small scale sustainable farming.

  • UES-401 Environmental Studies Capstone Course

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines a contemporary environmental issue for the development of senior project. Students will develop a proposal to address an identified issue from the multiple perspectives (e.g., policy, ethics, environmental justice, science and culture). As appropriate, the proposal will be field tested, demonstrated, or presented to the local community.

  • UES-403 Environmental Studies Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement. Junior standing or above required or consent of the instructor. Retricted to CUES major/minor students only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course combines a practicum placement of at least 10 hours a week for 12 weeks in a position that offered the student significant opportunity to learn about environmental problems as the basis for reflection, analysis, and skill development through appropriate reading, writing, and oral presentation assignments. Specific learning objectives will be tailored to the student's placement. Interested students should consult instructor in advance. ECR. 4 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing, limited to Environmental Studies majors and minors.

  • UES-420 German Greens and Environmentalism

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates the rise of the Green Party, from its grass-roots beginnings to participation in the federal government. Background on the development of green consciousness in Germany and Europe since the early 20th century. Present governmental policies and programs (e.g., alternative energy sources, organic farming, recycling, dismantling of nuclear power). Cross-listed GER 420 and GVT 420

  • UES-450 Lobbying, Media, and Public Policy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines different sides of environmental and energy concerns championed by the media and the responses of politicians, public government, and the public to these issues. Probes the roles that politicians, lobbyists, and the media have in framing the debate on environmental issues and in the development of resulting public policy. Considers scientific evidence about complex environmental issues (climate change) and the challenges of analyzing and articulating these issues.

  • UES-500 Experiential Learning in Environmental Science/Studies

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    This course requires students to complete a minimum of 15 engagement hours per semester. Students gain exposure to a variety of activities related to CUES research and development in a laboratory or field setting with faculty oversight. Permission of instructor required. May be taken more than once.

  • UES-503 Local Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors and minors only with junior standing.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Application of the principles and techniques of environmental science or studies to a specific environmental problem through a local internship placement of 10 hours per week (minimum) for 12 weeks. Typically, this experience will include literature research, classroom meetings, and field work in an off-campus environmental agency or NGO.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • UES-505 Global Internship

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Application of the principles and techniques of environmental science or studies to a specific environmental problem through a global internship placement of 10 hours per week (minimum) for 12 weeks. Typically, this experience will include literature research, classroom meetings, and field work in an off-campus environmental agency or NGO.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • UES-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    This is an independent study in environmental studies. Topics will vary.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • UES-511 Professional Development Module

    Prerequisites:

    Environmental Studies or Environmental Science major or minor with junior standing

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Analyzes students' interests, skills, values, and experiences in the context of career planning for the environmental fields. Provides understanding of how to present professional accomplishments, conduct a job search, or prepare for graduate work.

  • UES-555 Senior Thesis

    Prerequisites:

    Grade point average 3.0 overall, 3.4 in major; completion of a minimum of 8 credits in courses that are part of the Environmental Studies major at Suffolk University; consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Individual program of reading, research, writing on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the CUES Honors Advisory Committee, for CUES majors who are candidates for honors in a CUES major and who wish to prepare a thesis for submission to the honors committee. Must normally be taken in the senior year.