Boston College and Suffolk University have arranged for the preferred admission of qualified Suffolk students to the Master of Science in Applied Economics program at Boston College. Preferred admission is open to Economics, International Economics, and Business Economics majors who meet the following criteria. 

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Anticipated successful completion of a bachelor's degree in Economics, International Economics, or Business Economics from Suffolk in May of their senior year
  • A minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 at Suffolk
  • Submission of all Applied Economics application materials by the published Boston College deadline for entry into the term beginning the next fall. The application may be completed online.  

Preferred Admission Benefits:

  • A waiver of the application fee
  • A waiver of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE)
  • Preferred admission into the Applied Economics program without the competition of the rest of the applicant pool
  • Two courses (up to six credits) from Suffolk will transfer into the Applied Economics program as two graduate courses (up to six graduate credits) if a qualified student has completed up to two courses from the below list of transfer eligible courses with a grade of B or higher. The Applied Economics Graduate Program Director will determine for which two Applied Economics courses the qualified student will receive transfer credit.
  • The option to complete the remaining eight required Applied Economics graduate courses in one additional calendar year 

Accepted Suffolk University Transfer Eligible Courses*

  • EC-421 Public Finance

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101 and EC 102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The theory of tax policy and tax structure. The effects on economic behavior (including labor supply, saving, risk-taking and investment, charitable giving, and growth) of different taxes (income, sales, value-added, inheritance, wealth, property). Tax equity, efficiency and incidence, in the United States and in comparative perspective. Additional topics include modeling state taxes; social security and pensions; and tax compensation. Normally offered yearly.

  • EC-423 Economics of Regulation

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101 and EC 102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines regulation and analyzes the structure, conduct, and performance of American industry. Monopoly and strategic behavior in oligopoly and monopolistic competition are considered. U.S. antitrust law and the effect of regulatory laws on industrial performance are explored. Regulatory practices, rate setting, deregulation, public-enterprise pricing, and issues in privatization are examined, with an emphasis on case studies and policy analysis. Normally offered every other year.

  • EC-430 International Trade Theory & Policy

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101 and EC 102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines theories of international trade. The policy implications of each theory are explored and the effect of trade on the welfare of the nation is examined. Also the development of trade blocs and the the political economy of trade are studied. Normally offered every year.

  • EC-431 History of Economic Thought

    Prerequisites:

    EC-101 and EC-102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Presents the leading contemporary schools of economic thought as the outcome of theoretical and philosophical controversies that began with the ancient Greeks and that continue today. The course covers the major contributors to economic thought, including Aristotle, Aquinas, the mercantilists, and the contributors to the 18th-century enlightenment, notably Adam Smith and David Hume. Going forward, it considers Marx, the neoclassical school of Jevons, Menger and Walras and the Keynesian school, along with some of the more modern schools such as behaviorism, institutionalism and cognitive economics. The contributions of the economists and philosophers studied in the course are considered in context of the times in which they wrote and lived. Students will acquire a grasp of the principal tenets of contemporary economic theory as well as an understanding of the historical origins of the disputes that still divide economists on major theoretical and philosophic issues.

  • EC-433 Public Choice

    Prerequisites:

    EC-101 and EC-102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course considers the degree to which it is possible to explain, predict, and guide political decision through the application of economic analysis. The course is organized around two competing visions of public choice: (1) a traditional organic approach that sees the core problem for public choice as requiring the maximization of social welfare and (2) a newer contractual approach that sees that problem as requiring attention to the institutional framework within which political decisions are made. Topics to be considered include the Arrow paradox and other problems in aggregating individual choices, rent-seeking, the Leviathan hypothesis, and non- market demand-revealing methods.

  • EC-435 Economics of Energy and Natural Resources

    Prerequisites:

    Take EC-101;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course applies economic analysis to identify the origins, consequences, and policy implications of problems related to renewable and non-renewable natural resources, with particular attention to energy. Resources considered include forests, fisheries, water, minerals, and land. Energy resources covered include oil, gas, coal, nuclear, and alternatives (wind, solar, biomass, hydrogen, etc.), as well as electricity. Concepts examined include externalities, learning-by-doing, peak-load pricing, regulation, sustainability, cost-benefit analysis, and the commons problem.

  • EC-440 International Financial Economics

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101 and EC 102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is a combination of International Finance and Corporate Finance and designed to give students a strong foundation in the theory and practice of multinational financial management. Course materials include (a) basics of corporate finance and capital asset pricing, (b) foreign currency futures, (c) derivative securities in foreign exchange markets such as currency futures, options, swaps, (d) exchange risk management for multinational corporations, (e) global capital markets and financial crisis.

  • EC-442 International Monetary Economics

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101 and EC 102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The balance of payments and foreign exchange markets and instruments, and the determination of exchange rates. Balance-of-payments adjustments under alternative exchange-rate systems, international liquidity, international economics policy and open economy macroeconomics.

  • EC-445 The Economics of the European Union

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101 and EC 102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An economic analysis of the European Union, the history of European monetary and economic integration. and the creation of the Euro. A survey of the development and evolution of key European policies, such competition, industry, agriculture, environment, regional, etc. A discussion of economic implications of the enlargement of the European Union, as well as its trade relations with the U.S. and other countries within the context of the World Trade Organization.

  • EC-460 Game Theory

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101 and EC 102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to the foundations of game theory using applications from economics and everyday decision-making. The course examines the common strategic elements of interactions between consumers and producers, governments and citizens, politicians and their constituencies, countries and their trading partners, and various other participants in social relationships. The course provides a theoretical framework for modeling strategic interaction, beginning with the development of the concept of a Nash equilibrium, reputation, signaling, collective-action problems, and voting procedures and strategies. Normally offered every other year.

  • EC-483 Money, Banking & Financial Markets

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101, EC 102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the role of depository institutions and the Federal Reserve system in determining the supply of money. The course also explains the financial environment and the role of monetary policy decisions on changes in price, interest rates, money, and economic activity. The course provides the student with both theoretical and applied analysis. Prerequisites: EC 101, EC 102.

*In addition, alternative and applicable 300 to 599 level courses with an EC prefix can be submitted to determine whether they might qualify toward the two course transfer. This process is to be coordinated with the Program Director of the MS Applied Economics at Boston College to assist in targeting the application of these credits to particular elective requirements.